Last week the Texas Legislature opened its 83rd regular session.  The Texas Legislature meets every other year and only for 140 days.  Here are the labor and employment related bills that have been introduced that may eventually effect Texas employers.  I will supplement this post with newly filed bills during the session.

HB 372 (Deshotel) (Relating

Governor Perry signed SB 1024 eliminating a loophole that previously existed for a criminal theft of service charge.  Under prior law, a party obtaining services from another under a promise to pay could avoid a criminal charge of theft of service so long as the party was making minimal payments.  According to the bill’s analysis:

Theft of wages occurs when

The Texas Legislature completed its regular session and is now in special session to address school financing legislation.  The good news for Texas employers is that the Legislature did little damage to employer’s rights during the regular session.  Bills to bring Obama-styled legislation to the Texas Labor Code such as the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay

The Texas Legislature passed SB 321 and sent it to the Governor for approval.  The bill restricts public and private employers from prohibiting employees who are concealed handgun license holders, or otherwise lawfully possessing firearms or ammunition, from transporting or storing firearms or ammunition in the employee’s privately-owned, locked car on the employer’s premises. This bill does not apply to an employer

Its getting near the end of the time to sponsor bills for consideration during this Texas legislative session.  Here are the most recently enrolled bills potentially effecting Texas employers.

HB 2609 (Guillen) (relating to employment at or by certain facilities serving the elderly or persons with disabilities)

HB 2695 (Davis) (relating to acquiring Human Health