independent contractor

Lawyers prosecuting and defending wage and hour misclassification cases (i.e., exempt/nonexempt and employee/contractor) will emphasize how fact intensive these inquiries can be.   The importance of factual distinctions in litigating misclassification cases is demonstrated by two cases recently decided by the Fifth Circuit.  In Cromwell v. Driftwood Electrical Contractors, a panel of the

In another cable splicer misclassification case arising in the aftermath of hurricane Katrina, the Fifth Circuit affirmed a trial court decision that Louis Thibault was an independent contractor rather than an employee. Therefore, he was not entitled to overtime under the FLSA.

Thibault owned a business in his home state of Delaware selling picnic tables, storage

Companies using independent contractors to perform work normally performed by employees beware; state and federal governmental taxing authorities are challenging those classifications in an effort to increase tax revenue on wages that are not properly reported.  According to a recent article by the Associated Press, "the Internal Revenue Service and 37 states are cracking down on

Employers have long been challenged by a variety of wage and hour litigation such as misclassification cases and off-the-clock overtime cases.  One of the latest trends in wage and hour litigation is attacking a company’s classification of its workers as independent contractors instead of employees.  Because independent contractors are not entitled to certain aspects of benefits provided